Hollywood Steam Engine canvas print.

The Burrell a Hollywood Steam Engine canvas print

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Rod Coyne has created two prints especially for the Hollywood Fair 2016.  The Burrell and The Major which will also be discounted during the Hollywood Fair.

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Rod returns to the Hollywood Fair – The Burrell

Rod's painting demo at Hollywood Fair 2015.
Rod’s painting demo at Hollywood Fair 2015.

The Burrell: as you know Rod Coyne presents his unique “1916 Portrait Collection” at the Hollywood Fair. This exhibition is free, all are welcome. But what you didn’t know is that to celebrate the exhibition we are discounting the whole Canvas Print collection 33% at the Fair and online.

And now Rod has created two prints especially for the Hollywood Fair 2016.   The Burrell and The Major which will also be discounted during the Hollywood Fair.

The Burrell Road Locomotive head on.
The Burrell Road Locomotive head on.

Charles Burrell & Sons were builders of steam traction engines, agricultural machinery, steam trucks and steam tram engines. The company were based in Thetford, Norfolk and operated from the St Nicholas works on Minstergate and St Nicholas Street some of which survives today.

At their height they employed over 350 people and were the largest employer within the town. The company became known for producing reliable and good-looking steam-powered engines which were always built to customers’ requirements. The company declined after the First World War when internal combustion engines started to become a cheaper alternative to steam engines. The company finally closed in 1928, with the final engines being built Richard Garrett & Sons at Leiston, Suffolk.

Road locomotives
His Lordship, Burrell Showman’s road locomotive, in the Tom Varley collection. 1970s photo.

Sunday Drive - The Burrell at the Hollywood Fair.
Sunday Drive – The Burrell at the Hollywood Fair.

The first road locomotives started to emerge from the St Nicholas works in the late 1870s, with 14 engines specifically designed for the job of road haulage produced for a decade. Following the changes to the Locomotive Act and Locomotive on Highways in 1896 the market for Road Locomotives expanded considerably. Charles Burrell & Sons Road Locomotives were slightly modified versions of their general-purpose engines to allow for faster machines. A general-purpose engine was designed which spent much of its life stationary, powering belt-driven equipment, whereas a road locomotive was constantly on the move, therefore they needed stronger drive shafts, gears and wheels; additional water-carrying capacity; generally a canopy was fitted; solid flywheels and additional platework around the engine’s cylinder motion.

Rod Coyne prepares to paint the Burrell at the Hollywood Fair.
Rod Coyne prepares to paint the Burrell at the Hollywood Fair.

Loads hauled could be anything that could be carried in accompanying wagons, this included coal, bricks, stone, timber, grain etc. During the late 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for road locomotives to haul up to three fully laden wagons of 10 tons each, but as smaller steam engines became more common, the use of multiple wagons became infrequent – the use of Road Locomotives shifting to the movement of indivisible loads such as boilers, marine engine parts, railways engines or electrical equipment.

The largest engine produced by Charles Burrell & Sons was a Road Locomotive produced for the William Kerr of Mavisbank in Glasgow. Works number 3419, the engine was named “Clyde” and completed in October 1912. Clyde was a special order, built specifically for the haulage of enormous loads across the West of Scotland. Following many years of service the engine was sold at the end of the Second World War and driven away from Kerr’s yard in Glasgow by a young man and his wife and never seen again…

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